Race Recap: 2019 NBR Track Meet

Photo by Drew Reynolds

Photo by Drew Reynolds

It was a hot summer’s evening, a buzzing Friday night at McCarren Park.  Almost 20 women toed the track’s line at the southwest edge of the park, spectators made their way on the turf to the 200 meter marker. A gun fired. High-cadence footfalls padded into the ground. They were off. 

So began the 2019 McCarren Park Track Classic, in partnership with Brooklyn Running Company, Tracksmith, and Brooklyn Athletic Club, on July 12 at 6:15. Dozens of participants, volunteers, and supporters from teams across the NYC running scene collected to celebrate speed, spikes, and sportsmanship. It was a great night to run. 

The women’s mile, sponsored by Tracksmith, kicked off the night with an exciting display of pack running and smart pacing by the top 3 runners. Nicolette St. Lawrence of Distance Project NYC won out with a time of 5:23.7, holding off on making her move until the finishing kick. Linda Daniels of Distance Project took second, with a blazing 5:31.2, and NBR’s own Kaitlyn DiBello came in third, with a 5:32.7.

Three heats of the men’s mile followed, fast and fierce, with 32 entrants. NBR’s Alex Hoyt absolutely crushed it with a 4:26.7, easily coming through the finish first for the win. NBR’s Scott Easey came in second with a 4:32.9, racing strategically to close the gap in the bell lap, and ultimately overtaking John Butler (third with a 4:36.8) with about 200 meters to go. 

The two heats that followed were equally nail-biting, and were also filled with wonderful community moments. Members of the soccer teams that play on McCarren Park’s turf inner-track each night even came to join the fun, both in the mile race itself and as a group loudly cheering and supporting their teammates who made their way through the course. The energy was palpable.

Photos by Drew Reynolds

With the miles concluded, it was on to the relays: a women’s 4x400 race, a men’s 4x400 race, and a co-ed race. NBR teammates, past and present, gathered for the event, and the impressive results showed—it was competition and camaraderie at its height. The sun was on its way down and crowds began to collect in even larger numbers, 

The women’s 4x400, which started off the relay portion of the meet, was stacked with three teams from NBR: Team Wombat, the Mourning Doves, and the Kaboose Crew. All three teams flew through the finish, gracefully handing off the colorful batons as they completed their respective legs. Team Wombat (NBR’s Becca Ades and Kaitlyn DiBello, who doubled down from the mile, as well as Sara Heegaard and Gabby Tofig), gave an incredible performance with a time of 4:44.1. 

The Doves, a group of women who’ve run together on NBR for years—even as they’ve moved through different stages of life and running—came back together in a historic moment for this event. Their account of the race is below. 

Leg 1: Marie Barnett: 

"This race could only be awesome and fun, because it was with 3 incredible teammates and women that I learn from every day. I had no idea what to expect in my first race 13 weeks after having a baby, but my goal was to enjoy it and have fun passing off to Rebecca... and giving it my best trying to keep up with Becca Ades! What a blast realizing I could still move my legs with some speed and could still feel the joy of jelly legs in the last 100 meters as Rebecca was dancing her way through the handoff."

Leg 2: Rebecca Turnbull: 

"What running means to me seems to change from year to year. After a couple years running through injury and pregnancy, this year running meant dying in the last 100 and peeing myself. It also meant my husband handing me our eight month old who just learned to clap at the finish line. I'm still grateful every day for this sport and our community.”

Leg 3: Miriam Beyer: 

"As I came out of the last turn, my only real thought was: Don't crash into your pregnant teammate. Ever clumsy, I could see myself getting anxious about the handoff, losing my footing and toppling dramatically into Sue - taking out not only our relay anchor, but NBR’s president! I focused, concentrated very hard on my form and successfully passed the baton to Sue. Exxxxxhale. Go Sue!"

Leg 4: Sue Walsh

"Right before the race, as all races I've done while I'm pregnant, I'm like "Why am I doing this?" The answer is to run with friends and celebrate that running is possible, no matter what else your body is doing–like growing brain cells and muscles and skin for a little baby inside you. You gotta embrace the motto 'Allow yourself to change' if you run when you're pregnant. I was 28 weeks at the race and I think I ran about my marathon PR pace (7:50 minute mile) for the 400, even though that's only 1/104 of the marathon distance. But all of the cheers and the love and the high fives and the friendship and this great team, NBR, make it totally worth it."

Following the women’s relay was the men’s relay, which proved similarly exhilarating. The NBR Men, a group of four dynamos on our Local Competitive Team (including Men’s Mile winner, Alex Hoyt), blitzed through each 400 at breakneck speed and culminated in an unreal 3:38.8. 

Last came the coed relay, which comprised four teams, all within NBR. The healthy competition and sheer joy that was experienced by all who participated was so apparent. The aptly named team, You Need to Calm Down (everyone was really excited that night) came through the finish with an impressive 4:35.9, and team Ryan Pattie’s Butt closely followed with a speedy 4:59.7. No matter the results, though, an enormous amount of fun was had throughout the night. 

We can’t wait to do it again next year. 

Photo by Drew Reynolds

Photo by Drew Reynolds

See all the participants, teams, and results below:


Women’s Mile sponsored by Tracksmith

  1. Nicolette St. Lawrence, Distance Project NYC, 5:23.7

  2. Linda Daniels, Distance Project NYC, 5:31.6

  3. Kaitlin DiBello, North Brooklyn Runners, 5:32.7

  4. Sarah Mallory, North Brooklyn Runners, 5:35.3

  5. Becca Ades, North Brooklyn Runners, 5:42.0

  6. Katherine Edwards, Dashing Whippets, 5:44.7

  7. Eva Sturgeon, North Brooklyn Runners, 5:49.7

  8. Jess Jones, North Brooklyn Runners, 6:14.6

  9. Connie Allen, North Brooklyn Runners, 6:26.6

  10. Jeanina Encizo, North Brooklyn Runners, 6:27.4

  11. Phylicia Cannon, Strides NYC, 6:38.1

  12. Caroline Olkowski, Strides NYC, 6:42.8

  13. Annie Noltig, North Brooklyn Runners, 7:07.8

  14. Isabelle Spies, 7:24.4

  15. Ilona Wisniewska, North Brooklyn Runners, 7:53.8

  16. Louise O'Neill, North Brooklyn Runners, 7:54.7

  17. Linda Chan, Prospect Park, 12:10.0


Men’s Mile sponsored by Tracksmith

  1. Alex Hoyt, North Brooklyn Runners, 4:26.7

  2. Scott Easey, North Brooklyn Runners, 4:32.9

  3. John Butler, 4:36.8

  4. Jay Schaibhum, North Brooklyn Runners, 4:41.5

  5. Garen Riedel, 4:42.7

  6. Nicolas Adams, North Brooklyn Runners, 4:44.5

  7. Jerry Faulkner, NYAC, 4:46.8

  8. Taylor Burmeister, 4:47.1

  9. Noah Deveraux, Prospect Park, 4:47.5

  10. Oran Bambrick, 4:54.6

  11. Xavier Negron, 4:56.1

  12. Toby Zitsman, North Brooklyn Runners, 4:57.2

  13. John McElroy, 5:04.2

  14. Sean Quealy, Prospect Park, 5:04.2

  15. Jim Iseman, North Brooklyn Runners, 5:06.3

  16. Mike Fosco, Dashing Whippets, 5:07.0

  17. Sam Buraj, Fort Greene, 5:13.5

  18. Marvin Yang, North Brooklyn Runners, 5:15.1

  19. Corey Morenz, North Brooklyn Runners, 5:16.8

  20. Bryan Kim, 5:19.6

  21. Benjamin Lazo, 5:21.1

  22. Logan Yu, North Brooklyn Runners, 5:21.4

  23. Julian Rosow, North Brooklyn Runners, 5:21.9

  24. David Dorsey, Central Park Track Club, 5:22.3

  25. Matthew White, North Brooklyn Runners, 5:23.0

  26. Billy Barone, Dashing Whippets, 5:23.5

  27. Corey Hanson, Queens Distance Runners, 5:23.7

  28. Rob Sabotnik, North Brooklyn Runners, 5:34.5

  29. Jose Buitrago, 5:35.9

  30. Mahir Rahman, North Brooklyn Runners, 5:39.8

  31. Juan Carbowal, 5:50.5

  32. Erik Tatrom, FrontRunners NY, 5:56.6

  33. Marek Stepriowski, DDRC, 5:59.6

  34. Steven Gerardi, North Brooklyn Runners, 6:00.8

  35. Marco D'Addezio, 6:01.7

  36. Trey Beddingfield, FrontRunners NY, 6:02.7

  37. Sascha Wittler, North Brooklyn Runners, 6:11.0

  38. Vikram Singh, Queens Distance Runners, 6:12.6

  39. Brendan Loffus, North Brooklyn Runners, 6:17.5

  40. C.K. Tang, 6:18.6

  41. Pedro Rodriguez, 6:56.8

  42. Cliff Frasier, North Brooklyn Runners, 7:28.6

Women’s 4x400m Relay

  1. Team Wombat, 4:44.1

  2. Doves, 5:58.4

  3. Kabose Crew, 6:11.8

Men’s 4x400m Relay

  1. NBR Men, 3:38.8

  2. ???, 4:15.8

  3. FrontRunners NY, 4:17.4

  4. Summer Knights, 4:19.3

  5. Lonely Boyz, 4:20.8

  6. Data Dawg, 4:24.5

  7. Beer Hunter, 4:24.8

  8. Foolish Elders, 4:41.7

Coed 4x400m Relay

  1. You Need to Calm Down, 4:35.9

  2. Ryan Patty's Butt, 4:59.7

  3. Beauty Crew, 5:01.9

  4. NBR Board, 5:18.7

July Runner of the Month: Beverly Walley

Running the Fifth Avenue Mile

Running the Fifth Avenue Mile

Beverly Walley is one of NBR’s OG members, having joined shortly after the club was formed in 2009.

“I was training for the Brooklyn Half and getting bored running by myself over the bridge and back,” she says. “One day, I tried the track for a workout and I saw a flyer to recruit people from the neighborhood into a run club. I thought, ‘Why not give it a shot?’ ” 

A decade later, she’s still running with NBR. “Because I love all you crazy, fun people. What a wonderful community grew out of these weekly runs!” A former Just South Trivia run leader, she currently leads the Sunday Funday Run while also helping out with NBR’s social plans. The NBR board chose her as July’s Runner of the Month.

Running history: Bev’s been a runner ever since high school. “But shockingly, I was not the local track star.” (She has a faster mile time now at age 40 than she did at 16.) When she ran the Brooklyn Half in 2009, she found her sweet spot. “It turns out running further is a much better feeling for me than attempting to run fast.” Since then, she’s run one or two marathons a year. “Also, I ran a 60K in Central Park and survived it, but the post-run Shake Shack splurge almost took me out.”

What she does when not running: “Walk dogs. Play with dogs. Basically, encourage people to adopt a dog or dogs.”

Favorite race distance: 15K. “We need more of those!”

Best running memory: “It’s a tie—Team Russell Slimmons, Team Pool Party, Team Never Nudes!” 

Team Russell Slimmons

Team Russell Slimmons

Favorite running route in NYC: Anything involving the Brooklyn waterfront. “I’m particularly fond of the Statue of Liberty views at Red Hook’s Valentino Pier and the view of Manhattan from Brooklyn Bridge Park. Or the lead poisoned Red Hook track with Louise.” 

Favorite post-race food: Beer. 

Favorite song to run to: “I am not restarting the great Google group headphone debate.” 

How running has changed her: “I used to joke at work that you didn’t want to deal with me if I skipped my run. Running has made me a better human being. Over the years, it’s served different functions—a stress reliever, a therapist, a true friend and a feeling of freedom.” 

Worst part about being a runner: “Chafing. The chafe is real.”

Best advice to running newbies: “Keep going! You have to push past the initial suck and then it is the most rewarding feeling. A lot of running is mental. It’s pain and bliss.”

Current running goal: To qualify for the Boston Marathon. “I really, really, really want to get a time that gets me into Boston.” 

Bev, far left, running the Brooklyn Mile

Bev, far left, running the Brooklyn Mile

Club Points Race: Queens 10K Race Recp

It's only been a week since our last club points race but the Queens 10K is still fresh on our minds. We showed out in force and our Masters Men contingent both 40+ and 50+ continues to keep a strong hold on 2nd place again coming in 3rd overall led by Greg Baldinger, Henry Arroyo, Quinn Batson, Joe Chan, Alexander Walsh, and Stephen Bonica. Our opens Men and Women keeps us in the thick of things coming in 5th and 6th respectively. As it stands we are still locked into 4th place in the standings overall in both. Some outstanding individual performances were on display as well with 11 age group top ten finishes including our very own tempo leader Becca Ades (tempo does work if you want to get faster!) and of course we always love seeing new faces and encourage anyone to race with NBR. You can't be too fast or too slow as we like to say with four first time racers under NBR. Looking forward to seeing everyone out there for Team Champs!

- Your Friendly Team Stats Coordinator (Anthony -spicy Zhu and always in spirit Logan Yu Somewhere)

NBR Race Results for 2019 NYRR Queens 10K

Date and Time: June 15, 2019, 7:45 AM

Location: Flushing Meadow, NYC

Weather: 61 degrees, 56% humidity, wind calm

Open Class Men

5th Place 02:46:16

Gregory Clark 00:32:48

Pablo Kohan 00:32:50

Scott Easey 00:33:26

Alexander Woolverton 00:33:29

Ciaran O'donovan 00:33:43

Open Class Women

6th Place 03:21:54

Sara Heegaard 00:38:39

Becca Ades 00:39:23

Kaitlyn Dibello 00:40:16

Alyssa Taylor 00:41:45

Sarah Mallory 00:41:51

Masters Men 40+

5th Place 01:53:05

Alexander Walsh 00:37:15

Joe Chan 00:37:52

Stephen Bonica 00:37:58

Masters Women 40+

20th Place 02:32:03

Natalie Gleed 00:47:54

Elizabeth Shea 00:50:03

Claire Crossman 00:54:06

Masters Men 50+

3rd Place 02:00:51

Henry Arroyo 00:40:03

Gregg Baldinger 00:40:18

Quinn Batson 00:40:30

Masters Women 50+

20th Place 02:59:06

Claire Crossman 00:54:06

Carla Heiss 00:59:18

Teresa Curtin 01:05:42

PRs (43)

*by NYRR races only

Name PR Time Previous Best Time Previous Best Race Previous Best Date Days Since Last PR

Pablo Kohan 32:50 34:54 2018 NYRR Queens 10K 2018-06-16 364

John Mulvaney 33:51 34:10 2019 NYRR Joe Kleinerman 10K 2019-01-05 161

John Montes 34:39 35:44 2019 NYRR Joe Kleinerman 10K 2019-01-05 161

Michael Bushoy 37:51 39:31 Scotland Run (10K) 2015-04-04 1533

Sara Heegaard 38:39 41:53 2017 UAE Healthy Kidney 10K 2017-04-09 797

Victor Mendez 38:41 39:51 2018 NYRR Queens 10K 2018-06-16 364

Greg Swiatek 39:26 40:04 2019 UAE Healthy Kidney 10K 2019-04-28 48

Nathaniel Hobelman 40:05 40:20 2018 NYRR Grete's Great Gallop (10K) 2018-10-06 252

Kaitlyn Dibello 40:16 40:35 2019 UAE Healthy Kidney 10K 2019-04-28 48

Alejandro Jaramillo 40:19 40:49 2019 UAE Healthy Kidney 10K 2019-04-28 48

Derek Bronston 41:36 43:10 2019 UAE Healthy Kidney 10K 2019-04-28 48

Sarah Mallory 41:51 44:15 2019 NYRR Joe Kleinerman 10K 2019-01-05 161

Aaron Brett 41:59 42:25 2019 UAE Healthy Kidney 10K 2019-04-28 48

Tyler Farrar 42:08 42:12 2018 NYRR Grete's Great Gallop (10K) 2018-10-06 252

Robert Sobotnik 42:10 42:53 2018 NYRR Queens 10K 2018-06-16 364

David Goss 42:25 42:32 2019 NYRR Joe Kleinerman 10K 2019-01-05 161

James King 42:52 43:09 2018 NYRR Queens 10K 2018-06-16 364

Lisa Zhu 43:22 43:40 2019 NYRR Joe Kleinerman 10K 2019-01-05 161

Robert Dziedzic 43:23 46:47 2018 NYRR Queens 10K 2018-06-16 364

Anthony Zhu 43:55 44:59 2018 UAE Healthy Kidney 10K 2018-04-29 412

Nicoletta Lakatos 43:57 44:25 2016 NYRR Five-Borough Series: Queens 10K 2016-06-18 1092

William Sicheri 44:33 47:32 Healthy Kidney 10K 2009-05-16 3682

Megan Stoutz 44:47 45:39 2019 NYRR New York Mini 10K 2019-06-08 7

Christopher Bloome 45:15 45:33 2018 NYRR Grete's Great Gallop (10K) 2018-10-06 252

Geoffrey Johnson 45:58 50:08 2018 NYRR Queens 10K 2018-06-16 364

Sara Cohen 46:15 46:59 2018 NYRR Queens 10K 2018-06-16 364

Dan Torrens 46:18 46:54 2019 UAE Healthy Kidney 10K 2019-04-28 48

Riley Wolfe 46:49 48:57 2019 UAE Healthy Kidney 10K 2019-04-28 48

Linda Ullrich 50:00 51:37 2018 NYRR New York Mini 10K 2018-06-09 371

Elizabeth Shea 50:03 51:32 2018 NYRR Queens 10K 2018-06-16 364

Alexis Mclauchlan 53:26 54:22 2019 NYRR New York Mini 10K 2019-06-08 7

Ryan Pattie 54:15 1:00:02 2018 NYRR Queens 10K 2018-06-16 364

Motoko Yuri 54:31 55:17 2018 NYRR New York Mini 10K 2018-06-09 371

Michael Maye 54:46 56:42 2019 UAE Healthy Kidney 10K 2019-04-28 48

Alexandra Kawecki 54:55 58:14 UAE Healthy Kidney 10K 2015-05-30 1477

Ray Valderrama 55:22 58:49 2017 NYRR Queens 10K 2017-06-17 728

Chris Nikkel 57:14 57:35 2018 NYRR Queens 10K 2018-06-16 364

Kerry Novilla 58:59 1:23:25 2014 NYRR 5-Borough Series: Queens 10K 2014-06-22 1819

Clara Ritger 59:05 1:04:25 2019 NYRR Joe Kleinerman 10K 2019-01-05 161

Eduardo Soto 1:01:43 1:09:32 2017 NYRR Grete's Great Gallop (10K) 2017-10-01 622

Marv Pierre-jean 1:02:20 1:04:25 2018 NYRR Grete's Great Gallop (10K) 2018-10-06 252

Delcy Winters 1:04:42 1:05:47 2015 NYRR Five-Borough Series: Queens 10K 2015-06-21 1455

Bih Woo 1:07:44 1:08:12 2017 NYRR Queens 10K 2017-06-17 728

Age Group Top Ten (11)

*actual AG places. NYRR sometimes removes elites and prize money winners from Age Group Awards so NYRR AG places might be higher. If you are close to top 3, check the NYRR official results page. And for claiming top 3 award plaques, submit the form athttps://help.nyrr.org/customer/portal/articles/1936966-claiming-age-group-awards

Age Place Name Age Gender Time

6 Gregory Clark 27 m 32:48

3 Pablo Kohan 37 m 32:50

9 Scott Easey 28 m 33:26

10 Alexander Woolverton 32 m 33:29

10 Joe Chan 47 m 37:52

5 Sara Heegaard 26 f 38:39

8 Becca Ades 35 f 39:23

9 Henry Arroyo 52 m 40:03

7 Kaitlyn Dibello 28 f 40:16

6 Quinn Batson 58 m 40:30

7 Alyssa Taylor 23 f 41:45

First race with NBR! (4)

William Sicheri

Lisa Ren

Michael Maye

Jenny Li

First NYRR 6.2M Race (16)

Gregory Clark

Alyssa Taylor

Slavik Kaplevich

Korey Mccants

Alena Alasheeva

Jonathan Oldershaw

Max Gordon

Sascha Wittler

Aimee Ortiz-tolley

Charles Baxter

Jonathan Doro

Josh Alfred

Jayne Johnson

Lisa Ziviello

John Stankevich

Jenny Li

130 Total Finishers

Overall Women - 48 finishers

Overall Gender Age Name Gender Pace Net Time Age AG Gender AG Percent City State Country

217 26 5 Sara Heegaard f 06:14 38:39 26 43 78.50 minnetonka mn usa

282 32 8 Becca Ades f 06:21 39:23 35 49 77.57 sunnyside ny usa

377 42 7 Kaitlyn Dibello f 06:29 40:16 28 69 75.36 brooklyn ny usa

566 58 7 Alyssa Taylor f 06:44 41:45 23 104 72.68 brooklyn ny usa

586 62 17 Sarah Mallory f 06:45 41:51 28 109 72.48 brooklyn ny usa

876 96 29 Lisa Zhu f 06:59 43:22 31 167 69.96 brooklyn ny usa

999 113 35 Nicoletta Lakatos f 07:05 43:57 32 194 69.10 burlington can

1183 140 19 Megan Stoutz f 07:13 44:47 24 260 67.75 brooklyn ny usa

1365 168 24 Alena Alasheeva f 07:21 45:36 38 257 67.77 long island city ny usa

1427 177 52 Sarah Murphy f 07:23 45:49 30 345 66.22 brooklyn ny usa

1552 199 50 Sara Cohen f 07:27 46:15 28 375 65.59 new york ny usa

1762 243 25 Laura Mclaughlin f 07:34 46:56 24 442 64.63 new york ny usa

2070 319 35 Natalie Gleed f 07:43 47:54 40 406 65.20 brooklyn ny gbr

2807 502 130 Linda Ullrich f 08:03 50:00 30 826 60.68 new york ny ger

2825 510 55 Elizabeth Shea f 08:04 50:03 42 569 63.24 sunnyside ny usa

2994 560 137 Emily Law f 08:08 50:31 32 891 60.12 houston tx usa

3404 688 191 Lisa Ren f 08:20 51:41 28 1093 58.69 white plains ny usa

3520 739 179 Aimee Ortiz-tolley f 08:22 51:57 34 1100 58.67 brooklyn ny usa

3980 911 151 Jennifer Herr f 08:31 52:56 39 1097 58.68 brooklyn ny usa

4192 995 233 Alexis Mclauchlan f 08:36 53:26 31 1450 56.78 brooklyn ny usa

4460 1104 52 Claire Crossman f 08:43 54:06 53 368 65.71 new york ny usa

4570 1154 269 Caitlin Papageorge f 08:45 54:20 33 1611 55.97 brooklyn ny usa

4655 1197 203 Motoko Yuri f 08:47 54:31 35 1601 56.03 new york ny jpn

4781 1251 212 Jayne Johnson f 08:50 54:50 36 1631 55.90 brooklyn ny usa

4829 1273 295 Alexandra Kawecki f 08:51 54:55 32 1753 55.30 long island city ny usa

5334 1510 339 Monica Llamas Smith f 09:03 56:10 31 2005 54.03 brooklyn ny gua

5524 1599 355 Jennifer Novelli f 09:07 56:34 31 2111 53.64 brooklyn ny usa

5837 1764 289 Jennifer Gardner f 09:14 57:18 37 2096 53.69 brooklyn ny usa

5971 1827 436 Sarah Been f 09:17 57:39 25 2353 52.62 brooklyn ny usa

6550 2120 497 Clara Ritger f 09:31 59:05 28 2642 51.35 brooklyn ny usa

6633 2168 121 Carla Heiss f 09:33 59:18 50 1265 57.80 long island city ny usa

6843 2277 285 Elena Zeller f 09:39 59:52 44 2090 53.72 brooklyn ny usa

7087 2404 305 Lisa Ziviello f 09:46 1:00:37 43 2358 52.61 brooklyn ny usa

7362 2562 592 Aya Abdallah f 09:54 1:01:26 25 3108 49.39 brooklyn ny usa

8102 3025 289 Caterina Delogu f 10:15 1:03:39 48 2359 52.61 new york ny ita

8400 3195 300 Delcy Winters f 10:25 1:04:42 49 2406 52.36 elmont ny usa

8666 3365 102 Teresa Curtin f 10:35 1:05:42 59 1149 58.41 brooklyn ny usa

8932 3538 760 Adrienne Markowski f 10:45 1:06:47 34 3988 45.63 maspeth ny usa

9054 3620 355 Bomina Slaski f 10:50 1:07:19 45 3388 48.21 brooklyn ny can

9178 3696 117 Bih Woo f 10:54 1:07:44 59 1473 56.66 brooklyn ny usa

9224 3726 794 Carleen Mclaughlin f 10:56 1:07:54 33 4156 44.79 brooklyn ny usa

9367 3830 816 Jenny Li f 11:02 1:08:30 25 4271 44.29 brooklyn ny usa

9897 4179 874 Elizabeth Fedden f 11:27 1:11:06 34 4554 42.87 brooklyn ny usa

10502 4600 947 Elizabeth Urban f 12:08 1:15:19 30 4898 40.28 new york ny usa

10701 4738 796 Nancy Long f 12:23 1:16:53 36 4950 39.87 hicksville ny usa

10817 4824 987 Bonnie Soto f 12:34 1:18:03 34 5045 39.04 ridgewood ny usa

10912 4893 684 Pat Duncan f 12:43 1:19:00 41 4957 39.78 brooklyn ny usa

11275 5164 999 Ilona Lesznik f 13:30 1:23:53 27 5305 36.17 wyckoff nj usa

Masters Women 40+ - 12 finishers

Overall Gender Age Name Gender Pace Net Time Age AG Gender AG Percent City State Country

2070 319 35 Natalie Gleed f 07:43 47:54 40 406 65.20 brooklyn ny gbr

2825 510 55 Elizabeth Shea f 08:04 50:03 42 569 63.24 sunnyside ny usa

4460 1104 52 Claire Crossman f 08:43 54:06 53 368 65.71 new york ny usa

6633 2168 121 Carla Heiss f 09:33 59:18 50 1265 57.80 long island city ny usa

6843 2277 285 Elena Zeller f 09:39 59:52 44 2090 53.72 brooklyn ny usa

7087 2404 305 Lisa Ziviello f 09:46 1:00:37 43 2358 52.61 brooklyn ny usa

8102 3025 289 Caterina Delogu f 10:15 1:03:39 48 2359 52.61 new york ny ita

8400 3195 300 Delcy Winters f 10:25 1:04:42 49 2406 52.36 elmont ny usa

8666 3365 102 Teresa Curtin f 10:35 1:05:42 59 1149 58.41 brooklyn ny usa

9054 3620 355 Bomina Slaski f 10:50 1:07:19 45 3388 48.21 brooklyn ny can

9178 3696 117 Bih Woo f 10:54 1:07:44 59 1473 56.66 brooklyn ny usa

10912 4893 684 Pat Duncan f 12:43 1:19:00 41 4957 39.78 brooklyn ny usa

Masters Women 50+ - 4 finishers

Overall Gender Age Name Gender Pace Net Time Age AG Gender AG Percent City State Country

4460 1104 52 Claire Crossman f 08:43 54:06 53 368 65.71 new york ny usa

6633 2168 121 Carla Heiss f 09:33 59:18 50 1265 57.80 long island city ny usa

8666 3365 102 Teresa Curtin f 10:35 1:05:42 59 1149 58.41 brooklyn ny usa

9178 3696 117 Bih Woo f 10:54 1:07:44 59 1473 56.66 brooklyn ny usa

Overall Men - 82 finishers

Overall Gender Age Name Gender Pace Net Time Age AG Gender AG Percent City State Country

18 18 6 Gregory Clark m 05:17 32:48 27 34 81.49 new york ny usa

19 19 3 Pablo Kohan m 05:17 32:50 37 25 82.87 maplewood nj usa

26 26 9 Scott Easey m 05:23 33:26 28 40 79.95 new york ny aus

28 28 10 Alexander Woolverton m 05:24 33:29 32 41 79.95 brooklyn ny usa

34 33 11 Ciaran O'donovan m 05:26 33:43 34 47 79.71 brooklyn ny usa

35 34 14 John Mulvaney m 05:27 33:51 28 61 78.94 brooklyn ny usa

47 45 18 John Montes m 05:35 34:39 31 92 77.15 mount laurel township nj usa

48 46 19 Michael Darnell m 05:35 34:40 25 95 77.09 brooklyn ny usa

147 134 13 Alexander Walsh m 06:00 37:15 44 102 76.80 brooklyn ny usa

175 157 42 Julian Rosow m 06:06 37:51 25 300 70.61 new york ny usa

176 158 49 Michael Bushoy m 06:06 37:51 34 272 71.01 brooklyn ny usa

178 160 10 Joe Chan m 06:06 37:52 47 82 77.42 new rochelle ny usa

186 166 17 Stephen Bonica m 06:07 37:58 41 174 73.57 rockaway park ny usa

218 192 19 Elton Hassall m 06:14 38:40 43 183 73.38 brooklyn ny usa

219 193 38 Victor Mendez m 06:14 38:41 36 332 69.98 new york ny mex

280 249 53 Shane Clarke m 06:20 39:20 39 334 69.97 bronx ny usa

286 254 60 Greg Swiatek m 06:21 39:26 29 476 67.77 brooklyn ny usa

349 309 9 Henry Arroyo m 06:27 40:03 52 110 76.32 brooklyn ny usa

360 320 91 Nathaniel Hobelman m 06:27 40:05 34 545 67.06 brooklyn ny usa

382 340 12 Gregg Baldinger m 06:30 40:18 54 93 77.15 brooklyn ny usa

383 341 96 Alejandro Jaramillo m 06:30 40:19 31 627 66.32 brooklyn ny usa

407 364 6 Quinn Batson m 06:31 40:30 58 50 79.54 new york ny usa

415 372 72 Ryan Liu m 06:32 40:34 25 686 65.87 brooklyn ny usa

427 382 74 Kevin Vargas m 06:33 40:40 29 709 65.70 brooklyn ny usa

527 475 93 Stephen Boyd m 06:40 41:26 38 658 66.02 brooklyn ny usa

548 494 18 Derek Bronston m 06:42 41:36 51 199 72.84 brooklyn ny usa

608 543 110 Aaron Brett m 06:46 41:59 36 852 64.50 brooklyn ny rsa

633 567 166 Tyler Farrar m 06:47 42:08 32 967 63.53 brooklyn ny usa

638 572 101 Robert Sobotnik m 06:48 42:10 27 991 63.38 brooklyn ny usa

679 610 119 David Goss m 06:50 42:25 36 917 63.83 brooklyn ny usa

729 654 60 Lou Fox m 06:53 42:43 49 348 69.75 brooklyn ny usa

744 665 132 Slavik Kaplevich m 06:53 42:46 37 953 63.62 brooklyn ny usa

771 689 138 James King m 06:54 42:52 38 921 63.82 brooklyn ny usa

827 735 150 Percy Dextre m 06:58 43:12 38 1004 63.31 woodhaven ny per

835 743 153 Matthew Stevens m 06:58 43:15 37 1064 62.90 brooklyn ny usa

878 781 134 Robert Dziedzic m 06:59 43:23 26 1283 61.60 bronx ny usa

902 804 228 Korey Mccants m 07:00 43:29 30 1317 61.46 brooklyn ny usa

961 856 175 Oscar Benavides m 07:03 43:46 37 1206 62.15 brooklyn ny usa

989 879 152 Anthony Zhu m 07:04 43:55 29 1418 60.84 brooklyn ny usa

1090 968 162 Jose Ortiz m 07:09 44:23 28 1528 60.20 brooklyn ny usa

1123 998 113 William Sicheri m 07:11 44:33 45 825 64.72 brooklyn ny usa

1136 1009 168 David Lam m 07:11 44:36 29 1583 59.92 philadelphia pa usa

1281 1130 298 Christopher Bloome m 07:17 45:15 32 1735 59.14 astoria ny usa

1472 1288 249 Geoffrey Johnson m 07:24 45:58 38 1660 59.51 brooklyn ny usa

1566 1365 224 Dan Torrens m 07:28 46:18 28 2045 57.71 brooklyn ny usa

1687 1461 294 Jonathan Oldershaw m 07:32 46:43 35 2043 57.73 london gbr

1717 1486 365 Riley Wolfe m 07:33 46:49 31 2171 57.10 ridgewood ny usa

1910 1635 240 Max Gordon m 07:38 47:25 40 1882 58.45 brooklyn ny pan

1995 1694 252 Sascha Wittler m 07:41 47:43 42 1766 59.01 brooklyn ny ger

2241 1885 287 Christian Fischer m 07:48 48:26 44 1753 59.06 brooklyn ny ger

2362 1971 453 Pawel Bargiel m 07:51 48:46 34 2620 55.11 brooklyn ny pol

2385 1988 140 Jose Lasalle m 07:52 48:52 50 1309 61.50 new york ny usa

2554 2117 337 Teo Almonte m 07:57 49:19 25 2849 54.18 brooklyn ny usa

2961 2415 474 Jesse Miller m 08:07 50:26 38 2836 54.23 brooklyn ny usa

3674 2879 337 Jose Cordones m 08:25 52:17 46 2498 55.60 brooklyn ny usa

3778 2951 567 Corey Wowk m 08:27 52:29 38 3343 52.12 brooklyn ny usa

3791 2961 453 Charles Baxter m 08:27 52:30 25 3668 50.90 brooklyn ny usa

4106 3146 698 Anchit Choudhry m 08:34 53:14 30 3858 50.19 new york ny usa

4131 3164 370 Mauricio Medina m 08:35 53:17 47 2649 55.00 brooklyn ny usa

4157 3176 707 Jonathan Doro m 08:35 53:21 30 3878 50.09 brooklyn ny usa

4249 3229 716 Josh Alfred m 08:38 53:36 34 3870 50.14 brooklyn ny usa

4255 3232 380 Lou Figueroa m 08:38 53:37 45 2951 53.78 bronx ny usa

4523 3395 520 Ryan Pattie m 08:44 54:15 40 3612 51.10 brooklyn ny usa

4569 3416 403 Kevin Kalb m 08:45 54:20 46 3031 53.51 brooklyn ny usa

4743 3508 533 Martin Friedrichs m 08:49 54:44 41 3637 51.03 brooklyn ny ger

4755 3514 413 Michael Maye m 08:49 54:46 46 3120 53.08 ridgewood ny jam

5013 3661 557 Ray Valderrama m 08:55 55:22 43 3575 51.25 bayside ny usa

5653 3993 754 Christian Escobar m 09:10 56:53 36 4471 47.60 maspeth ny usa

5697 4014 472 Steven Gonzalez m 09:11 57:01 49 3308 52.26 staten island ny usa

5813 4061 309 Chris Nikkel m 09:13 57:14 51 3150 52.94 long island city ny usa

5828 4070 860 Anthony Petrillo m 09:13 57:17 33 4628 46.81 long island city ny usa

6080 4199 791 Art Cabrera m 09:19 57:54 37 4593 46.99 brooklyn ny usa

6084 4201 643 Reginald Staco m 09:20 57:54 40 4398 47.87 new york ny usa

6098 4209 497 Christopher Berndt m 09:20 57:57 48 3647 50.99 brooklyn ny usa

6506 4413 921 Kerry Novilla m 09:30 58:59 32 4916 45.38 manhattan ny usa

6528 4420 520 John Slaski m 09:30 59:02 48 3888 50.06 brooklyn ny usa

7472 4839 978 Eduardo Soto m 09:56 1:01:43 34 5244 43.55 ridgewood ny usa

7676 4927 993 Marv Pierre-jean m 10:02 1:02:20 30 5348 42.87 brooklyn ny usa

8692 5310 627 John Stankevich m 10:36 1:05:48 46 5137 44.18 brooklyn ny usa

9287 5517 448 John Breen m 10:58 1:08:08 53 4947 45.23 brooklyn ny irl

10501 5902 1176 Charles Walsh m 12:08 1:15:19 34 6046 35.69 brooklyn ny usa

11157 6083 910 Carlos Sinde m 13:11 1:21:51 42 6102 34.39 astoria ny usa

Masters Men 40+ - 30 finishers

Overall Gender Age Name Gender Pace Net Time Age AG Gender AG Percent City State Country

147 134 13 Alexander Walsh m 06:00 37:15 44 102 76.80 brooklyn ny usa

178 160 10 Joe Chan m 06:06 37:52 47 82 77.42 new rochelle ny usa

186 166 17 Stephen Bonica m 06:07 37:58 41 174 73.57 rockaway park ny usa

218 192 19 Elton Hassall m 06:14 38:40 43 183 73.38 brooklyn ny usa

349 309 9 Henry Arroyo m 06:27 40:03 52 110 76.32 brooklyn ny usa

382 340 12 Gregg Baldinger m 06:30 40:18 54 93 77.15 brooklyn ny usa

407 364 6 Quinn Batson m 06:31 40:30 58 50 79.54 new york ny usa

548 494 18 Derek Bronston m 06:42 41:36 51 199 72.84 brooklyn ny usa

729 654 60 Lou Fox m 06:53 42:43 49 348 69.75 brooklyn ny usa

1123 998 113 William Sicheri m 07:11 44:33 45 825 64.72 brooklyn ny usa

1910 1635 240 Max Gordon m 07:38 47:25 40 1882 58.45 brooklyn ny pan

1995 1694 252 Sascha Wittler m 07:41 47:43 42 1766 59.01 brooklyn ny ger

2241 1885 287 Christian Fischer m 07:48 48:26 44 1753 59.06 brooklyn ny ger

2385 1988 140 Jose Lasalle m 07:52 48:52 50 1309 61.50 new york ny usa

3674 2879 337 Jose Cordones m 08:25 52:17 46 2498 55.60 brooklyn ny usa

4131 3164 370 Mauricio Medina m 08:35 53:17 47 2649 55.00 brooklyn ny usa

4255 3232 380 Lou Figueroa m 08:38 53:37 45 2951 53.78 bronx ny usa

4523 3395 520 Ryan Pattie m 08:44 54:15 40 3612 51.10 brooklyn ny usa

4569 3416 403 Kevin Kalb m 08:45 54:20 46 3031 53.51 brooklyn ny usa

4743 3508 533 Martin Friedrichs m 08:49 54:44 41 3637 51.03 brooklyn ny ger

4755 3514 413 Michael Maye m 08:49 54:46 46 3120 53.08 ridgewood ny jam

5013 3661 557 Ray Valderrama m 08:55 55:22 43 3575 51.25 bayside ny usa

5697 4014 472 Steven Gonzalez m 09:11 57:01 49 3308 52.26 staten island ny usa

5813 4061 309 Chris Nikkel m 09:13 57:14 51 3150 52.94 long island city ny usa

6084 4201 643 Reginald Staco m 09:20 57:54 40 4398 47.87 new york ny usa

6098 4209 497 Christopher Berndt m 09:20 57:57 48 3647 50.99 brooklyn ny usa

6528 4420 520 John Slaski m 09:30 59:02 48 3888 50.06 brooklyn ny usa

8692 5310 627 John Stankevich m 10:36 1:05:48 46 5137 44.18 brooklyn ny usa

9287 5517 448 John Breen m 10:58 1:08:08 53 4947 45.23 brooklyn ny irl

11157 6083 910 Carlos Sinde m 13:11 1:21:51 42 6102 34.39 astoria ny usa

Masters Men 50+ - 7 finishers

Overall Gender Age Name Gender Pace Net Time Age AG Gender AG Percent City State Country

349 309 9 Henry Arroyo m 06:27 40:03 52 110 76.32 brooklyn ny usa

382 340 12 Gregg Baldinger m 06:30 40:18 54 93 77.15 brooklyn ny usa

407 364 6 Quinn Batson m 06:31 40:30 58 50 79.54 new york ny usa

548 494 18 Derek Bronston m 06:42 41:36 51 199 72.84 brooklyn ny usa

2385 1988 140 Jose Lasalle m 07:52 48:52 50 1309 61.50 new york ny usa

5813 4061 309 Chris Nikkel m 09:13 57:14 51 3150 52.94 long island city ny usa

9287 5517 448 John Breen m 10:58 1:08:08 53 4947 45.23 brooklyn ny irl

Form Tip: Float Your Way to the Finish

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So I know a lot of you aren't going to want to hear this, but efficient runners keep almost all of their weight on the forefoot throughout the weight-bearing phase of each stride cycle. This provides both shock absorption and energy return for propulsion for the next stride.

This really sucks because I just can't quit you, heel striking!

Perhaps—that is to say, possibly—the single most important performance-related running variable is ground contact time. It's at least top three. Reducing your ground contact time is an effective way to improve all aspects of your running. To do the math for you right now: floating = 0 ground contact time. 

Not only math, but studies have demonstrated the importance of minimal ground contact to running performance: Finnish researchers (as in see you at the ___ line. hahaha ha) investigated the relationships between running mechanics, top running speed and economy. Of all the stride characteristics measured, only ground contact correlated with both running economy and maximal running speed. 

Wait, what? 

If you want to go fast without wasted effort, nothing else matters as much as trying to barely touch the ground!

Then there's the Japanese. Researchers from Ryukoku U videotaped the 15 km mark of a half-marathon and noticed the feet of the fastest runners spent the least time in contact with the ground.

Then there were the Rushins... Kidding. 

To make your biomechanics work towards less ground contact, your foot should land at your center of gravity and propel you forward. That is to say, most likely a mid or forefoot strike. The fast runners in the Japan study were mostly midfoot or forefoot strikers (runners among top 50 are almost twice as likely to be mid/forefooters than runners from 151–200 [so actually I take that to mean there's a chance for the heelers!!])

The key is to float. 

June Runners of the Month: Marie Barnett and Xander Woolverton

Marie Barnett and Xander Woolverton at the 2017 Chicago Marathon

Marie Barnett and Xander Woolverton at the 2017 Chicago Marathon

On April 10, NBR’s youngest member arrived: Oliver, the son of NBR super couple Marie Barnett and Xander Woolverton. Both Marie and Xander are standout runners on NBR’s Local Competitive team, and Marie co-led the Wednesday Mourning Doves run for the past five years until a recent move to Clinton Hill.

The pair met at Oberlin College in freshman year, but didn’t become friends (Marie: “He wasn’t very interesting or intriguing”) until they spent a night dancing together at a party during their senior year (Marie: “Strange dancer but very intriguing.”)

At the time, Marie was a competitive runner. Soon after they started dating, she won her Indoor Conference Championships in the 3,000m and came in second in the 5,000m the next day. Xander watched her train through the Ohio winter for the Boston Marathon, confused about what was happening when she went for long runs during 15-degree blizzards.

“Xander didn’t really understand the sport, the grit, the nuance, and what it meant to me,” says Marie. “I think he choked on his own lungs when he tried to run 3 miles with me during our first year together.” But his competitive personality got the best of him, and he started working to keep up with her, eventually developing his own passion for the sport.

Today, they support each others’ goals and push one another, sometimes training together and sometimes running apart, but always including running in their daily lives. Having a child hasn’t slowed them down. In the two months since Oliver’s birth, Marie has already started adjusting to postpartum running—and Xander has hit a hot streak, setting PRs in both the 10k and the half marathon.

Marie running the Fifth Avenue Mile. Photo by Ken Allen.

Marie running the Fifth Avenue Mile. Photo by Ken Allen.

When did you join NBR and why?

Xander: I joined in 2011 after James Chu spotted me doing a workout at the McCarren Park track. At the time, I was a member of another running club and had been looking for a group with more fast people to train with.

Marie: Xander was telling me how great it was. Then I met some of the women and appreciated the energy and vibe. I was glad to be part of a fun team that had numerous ways to access meetups and each other, at all levels of ability. I also wanted to run faster.


How has running changed for you since having a baby?

Marie: It’s changed so much! I ran up until 40 weeks pregnant (very slow and short), and am now adjusting to integrating my mom body with postpartum running. We have to be more intentional in coordinating to get our runs in. I am motivated to be patient and smart about coming back, and know things won’t feel exactly the same. I know way more about pelvic floors, and my pain threshold is higher! 

Do you want Oliver to be a runner when he grows up?

Marie: Of course, some part of me would love if he becomes a runner at some point in his life, so we can run places together and do some races. While I won’t push him to run, a lifestyle with physical activity is a must in our family.

Xander: I totally agree. I played lots of sports when I was a kid and in school, and I think that playing any sport (except football) is so important.

You are both very fast runners. Are you competitive with each other?

Xander:  When I first started running seriously, Marie was faster than me, and I was definitely competitive with her. But now, I don’t really feel competitive. I try to support her in pursuing her goals, whether they are related to running or something completely different, and I feel that same support from her.

Marie: In addition to agreeing with what Xander said, I still hold fondly the memory of blowing by him in the LA Marathon and beating him by 6 minutes. And I imagine we compare our age-graded percentiles (mine are usually higher) in races more than the average couple… 

Xander: I disagree that her age-graded percentiles are usually higher.

What do you do when you're not running?

Marie: I love spending time with Xander and Oliver doing absolutely anything. I love seeing friends, art, being around plants, dinner parties and of course consuming IPAs, red wine and a good whiskey. Aside from that, I spend most of my time as a clinical psychologist at a cancer center, helping kids, teenagers and young adults make sense of their illness and create their own narrative around life and death. 

Xander: After spending time with Marie and Oliver, I have a very busy job. But I love cooking and spending time with my friends.

What’s your favorite race distance?

Marie: The marathon (grit, endurance, subtle intensity, the buildup), followed by the 5k (far but also super hard, fast training).

Xander: I love the 3,000m and the 5,000m, but really anything on the indoor track. I love the banked turns, the competition of racing and of course that hacking cough you get from the dry air at the Armory in Washington Heights.

What’s your favorite running route in NYC?

Marie: I like routes for different reasons. Running to the Brooklyn Promenade and around the carousel is one of my favorite Doves runs. I also enjoy long runs with an NBR crew running bridges—Brooklyn (only before 7/8 am!), Manhattan, Williamsburg and Queensboro bridge combos—or running around Battery Park and up the West Side Highway (great for long tempos). A daily favorite now is Prospect Park loops.

Xander: Definitely this route which has a tour of the Brooklyn Bridge Park, Red Hook and Prospect Park.

What has running taught or changed about you?

Marie: Running has been part of my life since middle school. My relationship to running has changed with me as I have grown up. It is a form of therapy for me, and running on teams helped me build significant physical and mental toughness. I used to be very anxious and regimented about runs and racing. In other words, my mind got it my way. Now, I have learned gratitude for running, and how to use my mind to push my body harder. And I am amazed that being older does not mean slower.  

Xander: Setting ambitious goals and working to achieve them is what running is all about. When you are 16 weeks away from a marathon, it can be difficult to imagine that, on race day, you are going to be ready to attempt to run 26.2 miles at your goal pace. But if you are honest with yourself, make a plan and stick to that plan, you will be ready.

What is the worst part about being a runner?

Marie: Random running injuries (i.e., when I tripped on a Doves run and literally shattered my clavicle) or deserved running injuries (e.g., chronic overuse, trying to jump into workouts too much). Sometimes I feel sad I don’t have more time to do it; distance running really can be a time drain on the day.

Xander: I’m torn between losing toenails and the inevitability that my body will eventually break down as a result of the hobby that I love so much.

Xander running the Washington Heights 5k

Xander running the Washington Heights 5k

Best advice to running newbies:

You can’t be chasing PRs all year round, so balance yourself by sometimes having goals to just run without a pace or even a watch. (Run to the beach! End your run at a bar!) Remember, you are choosing to run and if it starts to feel stressful or cause anxiety in other areas of your life, it’s time to reset. Coaches, if you have one, can be amazing. Also, don’t only hang out with other runners.

Fun facts:

Marie: I ran up Pikes Peak (a 14,115 foot mountain) while attending a Colorado high altitude running camp in high school. 

Xander: I am starting to suspect that almost all of the outdoor tracks in NYC are 440 yards, not 400 meters.

Current running goals:

Marie: To beat the sh*t out of postpartum running. My plan is to PR in the 5k on my training buildup to a marathon PR in 2020. It seems more possible to run fast after having a baby: Your pain threshold is higher, you tolerate less crap, and you only have limited time for runs, so you have to make it count! 

Xander: Since Oliver was born, I have PRed in the 10k and the half marathon! There’s no way that’s going to continue forever, but I’d love to keep that going as long as possible.  

Marie running at 38 weeks pregnant. Photo by Drew Reynolds.

Marie running at 38 weeks pregnant. Photo by Drew Reynolds.

Providence Marathon Race Report: Miriam Beyer

The night before, we went to a baseball game. The original plan was to go to the game Sunday afternoon, after the race, but the forecast for Sunday afternoon—like the forecast for Sunday morning and the entire marathon in Providence—was 100% rain.

“Do you want to try to go to a game tonight instead?” my husband Tom asked over lunch. We were at a small cafe overlooking the river in Pawcatuck, Connecticut.

I was perplexed. A baseball game? The night before a big race? Is that a good idea? This was the last season the Pawtucket Red Sox would be at McCoy Stadium in Rhode Island, before they moved to Worcester. Tonight was our only opportunity to see them play. 

I finished my omelet and watched the river and in the end could come up with no good reason why we shouldn’t go to the game that night. What’s the harm! We had an early dinner and went to the stadium.  

It actually was perfect. I sat still, rested my body for three hours, and let the game and spring evening distract me from stressing about the race. In a break after the third inning, three people in giant eyeball costumes raced on the field to advertise a local optometrist. Green eye broke the tape, with some heat from brown eye (visual help, from 2018). It was delightful.

At the top of the seventh, with the PawSox down a run, we left the ballpark and went back to the hotel in downtown Providence. One of the nearby restaurants was hosting an outdoor barbecue with a very loud, very large sound system.  

“Do you think it will end soon?” I asked, laying out my race clothes to the bass beat.

“No,” Tom said. He was right.

In the morning, it was indeed raining, though not pouring. Runners huddled under bus stops, shrouded in ponchos and plastic bags. I warmed up, my three poncho layers slapping behind me like a deranged blue bird.

In the corral, I ripped off pieces of the ponchos and wrapped them around my fists. I did not wear gloves, since I knew they would immediately get wet and heavy. But my hands are usually cold and I will run in mittens into July if necessary. I pulled the ends of my arm warmers over my knuckles and bounced lightly to the music, keeping my knees loose. I felt gratitude for my NBR friends and training partners, who had kept me running through the winter. I thanked the ponchos for their service and winced, parting with them. I have never been particularly great at running in the rain.

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When my watch buzzed at the first mile, it was buried under my arm warmer and I decided to not wrestle with the layers, to not look. I assumed there would be time clocks along the course, and I thought: I am going to get comfortable in the rain and I am not going to stress.

The first time clock was not until the half. I saw I was 1:38 and did the math, sort of whimsically: If I do this same thing all over again I’ll have 3:16. I was feeling strong, working but not laboring. I extracted a second gel and promptly dropped it, fingers clumsy from the rain, which had not stopped drizzling since the start line. I swore, picked it up, and resumed.

Around mile 20, a strange thing happened. I felt good. This was my 14th marathon, and this had never happened. I had no register of time since the halfway mark, but I could see that I was reeling in runners. Ahead I saw a woman who had left me around mile 10, now shuffling and twisting. I passed her wide, in an arc of respect.

Someone, somewhere, started screaming, “Brooklyn! Brooklyn! Brooklynnnnnnn!” The NBR singlet, the love it gets. Someone, somewhere, instructed, “Use the bike path!” I was confused until I realized he was right: It was buoyant. I tried to spring.

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Tom was at 24 in his blue raincoat, and he ran alongside me on the sidewalk with encouragement. A nice cop at 25 cheerfully yelled, “Bring it home!” At the last turn, the finish in view, a woman I hadn’t seen on the course and I dug in to race home. When I crossed I didn’t know who beat whom because I could see only the time: 3:16. 

Irony is an often mis-cited concept but this was ironic. In the race where I had not once monitored my pace, I ran the most consistent marathon of my running life. My half splits were 1:38:22 and 1:38:34, 12 seconds apart. In the race where I ceded control, I ended up running more controlled than I ever had. In the race where I gave up control the night before, I ended up being more relaxed than I ever had.

If I consciously execute this strategy in the next race, will it work? Probably not. Marathons, like life, are full of surprises. It’s part of why we return to them again and again. They toss the pick-up sticks of our body into the air and splash them down in a new configuration, that we study and pick through with curiosity until the next race. I will always love the marathon.

After the race, we went to a restaurant for lunch. “It’s going to be about an hour, hour and a half,” the host said. I stared at her, my eyes graying and dull, lengthening like Wile E. Coyote’s when he realizes he’s run off a cliff. There was nothing to do but put in our name and wait. We went back into the rain and got wet all over again, checking my watch every five minutes to see how much time had passed. After about 40 minutes we could take it no longer and wandered back to the restaurant with hope.

The host brightened as we came in. “Welcome back,” she smiled. “Your table’s all set.”

May Runner of the Month: Jennifer Herr

If you’ve been running with NBR for any length of time, chances are, you’ve run with Jennifer Herr. Formerly NBR’s board president, she leads the Tuesday Just Central Run, Saturday Bridge Run and Sunday Funday Long Run, and is a regular at Wednesday Morning Doves and Thursday Night Track.

She joined NBR five years ago when, after a year of running by herself, a safety incident convinced her to find a group to train with. “At the finish line of the Brooklyn Half Marathon I saw a pack of NBR members having fun in Coney Island,” she says. “I attended my first Narwhals Run the following weekend.”

The camaraderie of the club has kept her coming back ever since. “We go above and beyond to encourage and cheer each other on at every race, workout and event, and definitely have each others' backs! I love being a part of that.”

Running the Bronx 10 Mile

Running the Bronx 10 Mile

What she does when she’s not running: I'm a Construction Manager for WeWork, and have been involved in design and construction in NYC over the past 15 years. Some projects I've worked on are Bushwick Inlet Park, affordable housing along Bushwick Ave, and the NYRR Run Center at Hearst Tower. I'm also a devoted partner, step-mom and cat-mom.

How she initially got into running:  In 2013 I signed up to run the McCarren 5K with a couple friends. Our goal was to run the whole thing at 10 min/mile pace, but after treadmill training for a few weeks, I exceeded our goal by running a 27 minute race and was hooked! I started training outdoors in Bed-Stuy, gradually tackling longer race distances, including the NYC Marathon that year.  

Favorite race distance: I love to race middle-distances: anything from 4 miles to half marathon. My least favorite distance is the marathon, but it's a love-hate relationship—I can't seem to stop running them.

Favorite NBR run: That's tough. I love different ones for different reasons: Just Central for allowing me to run with my neighbors at the crack of dawn; Doves for helping me improve my speed by chasing a great crew of NBR regulars; Thursday Night Track for being my hardest weekly workout with the reward of pizza and beer, Saturday Bridge Run for being the best start to every weekend with old and new friends; and Sunday Funday for being my most constant and fulfilling weekly adventure with NBR over the past 5 years.

Best running memory: The Salzburg Austria Marathon was the most gorgeous setting I've ever run in, along the base of mountains, through farmlands, woodlands, estates and old world cityscape. Finishing the Copenhagen marathon in 80 degree temperatures with my boyfriend and friends screaming and blowing kisses to me for my final kick was also memorable. And at the Berlin Marathon weekend Breakfast Run, I felt a profound sense of pride and inspiration running alongside NBR teammates Alisa, Gregg, HJ and Bev through the streets of Berlin, into the Olympic Stadium, seeing Jesse Owens' name and records inscribed on the stadium walls near the relic of Hitler's spectator box, and enjoying the German pastries at the end. I will also never forget racing in costume as a Runaway Bride and Roller Derby Queen with the all-girl "Hood to Philly"/"Hood to Haven" relay teams; many laughs were shared over two great weekends with NBR teammates.

“Finishing the Copenhagen marathon in 80 degree temperatures with my boyfriend and friends screaming and blowing kisses to me for my final kick was memorable.”

“Finishing the Copenhagen marathon in 80 degree temperatures with my boyfriend and friends screaming and blowing kisses to me for my final kick was memorable.”

Favorite running route in NYC: Long run to Highland and Forest Hills Parks—we've only done the full route twice with the Sunday Funday crew, but it's very adventurous and scenic. We should run it more.

What running has changed about her: Running's given me balance and peace. In my youth and college years, I was heavily involved in organized sports (gymnastics, tennis, basketball, tae kwon do and lacrosse) but I struggled in young adulthood once that participation ended. For several years, I filled the void with a lot of unhealthy things. When I started running in my early thirties, it quickly restored the discipline, purpose, pride, competition and sense of community that other sports had given me. Running has also taught me that age is not a deterrent to athletic success. My speed is only improving as I approach age 40, and I'm inspired by my NBR masters peers who also continue to excel. I aim to run for the rest of my life.

Favorite post-race food: Dim Sum! After a half or full marathon, I usually camp out in Chinatown or Flushing to gorge on soup dumplings, rice rolls, turnip cake and bok choy.

Favorite piece of running gear: I'm a sneakerhead, so it's gotta be the shoes! I train in Adidas Energy Boosts, race in Nike 4% Flyknits, and enjoy shopping far and wide for the best and most unique color ways of those shoes. (Ask me about the three pairs of watercolor style Adidas Energy Boosts I once had shipped from Japan—I will proudly show you their glamour shots.)

“The running community is the greatest, most supportive network to be a part of, so don't be intimidated.”

“The running community is the greatest, most supportive network to be a part of, so don't be intimidated.”

Favorite songs to run to: "Unstoppable" & "The Greatest" by Sia

Favorite pro runner: Usain Bolt for his swagger

Favorite running social media account: Darcy Budworth's Instagram (founder of the Take The Bridge race series, coach at Mile High Run Club). Darcy and I are work colleagues and collaborated on NBR's participation in the Williamsburg Bridge Take The Bridge race; I'm amazed by the array of things she accomplishes professionally and within the running community on any given day, and how well she documents it all.

Best advice to running newbies: The rewards of running go beyond pace, race times or how you compare to others. Give yourself a chance to find out how much running benefits your physical and mental wellness. The running community is also the greatest, most supportive network to be a part of, so don't be intimidated.

Current running goals: To run the Brooklyn Half marathon at a sub-8 min/mile pace, and the 2019 Marine Corp. Marathon in less than 4 hours.

Fun fact: I came in 3rd place at the 2016 Bed-Stuy 5K and the 2018 Bed-Stuy Turkey Trot, where I won a Sweet Potato Pie!

“My least favorite distance is the marathon, but it's a love-hate relationship—I can't seem to stop running them.”

“My least favorite distance is the marathon, but it's a love-hate relationship—I can't seem to stop running them.”

May Runner of the Month: James Gray King

When he crossed the finish line of the London Marathon on April 28, NBR team captain James Gray King completed an incredible challenge: He earned the Abbott World Marathon Majors Six Star Medal for running all six of the world major marathons in the past 18 months (Tokyo, Boston, London, Berlin, Chicago and New York City). Less than 5,000 people in the world have ever achieved this.

His new goal? “I’d like to run fewer marathons so close together, and see what I could do by training all out for one to really go for a great time. And maybe have a week off?”

NBR’s board chose James as one of May’s Runners of the Month to recognize his achievement.

James joined NBR in 2015. “I was pretty new to running and wanted to run with a group. Plus the singlets looked cool!”

James joined NBR in 2015. “I was pretty new to running and wanted to run with a group. Plus the singlets looked cool!”

What he loves about NBR: Mostly it’s the people, I have met some incredible friends (and my girlfriend Natalie) through NBR and been through good times and bad with them. It has also pushed me to be a better runner than I ever thought I could be. Overall though, having run races far and wide now, it’s pretty incredible to be able to hang out with teammates all over the world!

What he does when not running: I work in an Apple Store, and listen to all the same Hardcore and Indie bands I listened to 10 years ago. I am pretty sure I’ve become that old man that doesn’t think new bands are any good, although I’m trying to be better at that (sort of!).

How he got into running: We had a wellness challenge at work in February of 2015. I decided I would run a mile a day, pretty much my first miles ever. I hated it! That said, around the same time a friend was putting together a team for the charity Yamba Malawi, to run the Rock N Roll Brooklyn Half in the October. I am somewhat stubborn, an optimist and rather like doing things for charities. I decided to give it a shot and said to myself if I broke 2 hours I would run more... Low and behold, I beat it by the narrowest of margins and the rest is history!

Favorite race distance: I am 100% smitten with the marathon. At their absolute hardest is when you see the absolute best in people. It is also such a universal event for a city to get behind and you discover such a unique sense of character at each race that I feel it’s making my travel much richer. Conversely, I hate 5Ks and am pretty terrible at them!

Favorite NBR run: Thursday Night Track—because it's the best, but also I'm a run leader and it would be weird if I said something else.

“I am 100% smitten with the marathon.”

“I am 100% smitten with the marathon.”

Favorite NBR memory: I’m torn between seeing the NBR cheer squad out in force at mile 20 of the Berlin Marathon, and when six of us went on a group run in Amsterdam with all our singlets on. We likely looked like a very strange and non-threatening gang!

Best running moment: My first NYC Marathon finish in 2016. I think that’s when I really caught the bug!

Favorite running route in NYC: The 10-mile loop starting in Williamsburg, going over the bridge and looping back over Queensborough bridge is old faithful for me on mid-week longish runs. And running to the beach (any beach!)

How running has changed him: It has made change the bar for what I believe I could achieve. When I ran my first mile, I honestly could not understand how people could run 26 of them, let alone try to get quicker. It has also made me a more diligent person and (slightly) more organized. It also taught me I still have a problem with liking merch, I’ve just traded band T-Shirts for race shirts!

“You might the regret the run on you’re on, but you’ll never regret the run you did.”

“You might the regret the run on you’re on, but you’ll never regret the run you did.”

Favorite post-race food: Beer?! And chocolate milk. Like a proper grown up.

Favorite running gear: Nike 4%s!!!

Favorite pro runners: Kipchoge and Mo—by the time this is out I assume one of them will have just won London (again). They have such different mental approaches but are both incredibly down to earth considering the scale of their achievements.

The worst part about being a runner: The chafe! And being flaky with weekend plans!

Best advice to running newbies: Keep at it! You might the regret the run on you’re on, but you’ll never regret the run you did. Also, slow down as you learn and try to go a little further instead.

Fun facts: I once played in a hardcore band called Xmas Lights. And I lived in Kenya for a while, before I became a runner, what a missed opportunity to learn from the best!

Form Tip: Look to the Horizon

Like so many things in life, good running posture starts with the head. When the head tilts in any one direction, the body shifts off its optimal support axis which causes you to compensate—and generally become discombobulated. 

The head tilt and gaze are usually connected, so when you run, let your gaze guide you: Look out ahead naturally and scan the horizon (unless you're on a technical switchback in the Pyrenees, Killian Jornet–style). That'll straighten your neck and back into one line. If this doesn't work, try imagining a straight line so the weight of your head is carried down through your feet.

Doing this right can improve oxygen flow and conserve energy.

Unless you're trail running, work on not looking at the ground, not stretching your neck or jutting out your chin like Jay Leno. Poor head posture can lead to fatigue and injury.

For those pre-meds out there, get this: The head has a serious influence on your running because of the vestibular apparatus in the ears and cerebellum directly defining and regulating the body's position in space. If you doubt it, try running while vigorously shaking your head—ha, thought not. This regulation is accomplished through the neck muscles, which provide balance to the head and extend their influence to the rest of the muscular system of the body. 

What is the optimal distance of gaze? 10 meters? 40 yards? What's a meter? Who knows. The thing to keep in mind is keeping your head in a straight line with the weight supported down between the shoulders through the hips to the balls of your feet—like when you carry baskets on your head. (In fact, that's our next mile competition.) 

You will not—or should not—find a machine like this to warn you each time you slouch. Instead, try to internalize it. 


April Runner of the Month: Jeff Poindexter

Jeff Poindexter first ran for NBR at the Red Hook Crit in May 2016. “I wanted to run for a local team that could possibly challenge and beat the best of NYC,” he says. Since then, he’s been surprised to watch how being part of NBR has helped him grow as a runner.

As someone who loves 200 meter races just as much of the marathon, Jeff’s become a standout on NBR’s local competitive team, and was chosen as April’s Runner of the Month.

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What he does when not running: I work as a doorman/lifeguard for a residential building on the Upper East Side call the Concorde. 

How he first got into running: I've played sports my whole life. I was always one of the fastest. In elementary school, every year the physical fitness test came up and we had to run a mile. I used to eat skittles for energy during the mile. 

Best running memory: In high school, nine men including my brother and I won the regional meet. We were the underdogs, facing teams three times bigger than us.

Favorite post-race food: Pasta!

Favorite piece of running gear: Gore Windstopper 

Favorite song to get pumped up pre-run: Anything Juicy J

Favorite pro runners: Ryan Hall, Shalane Flanagan and Kip Lagat

Favorite running social media account: Runner’s World

Advice to running newbies: Don't be so quick to compare yourself to others. Be the best you. Take your time building mileage and take hard days hard, easy days easy. Do dynamic stretching before your run and static stretching after. Finally, water, water and agua!!!

Current running goal: I'm racing the Queens marathon and NYC marathon this year, thanks to NBR for the motivation.

Fun fact: When I'm not playing frogger in the streets of New York, I like to participate in some fitness modeling. You know, trying to inspire people.